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ElizabethWatasin

'Tis Nyte! by Elizabeth Watasin

Gothic Steampunk, Noir Sci-Fi, Diesel Fantasy. Bringing You Uncanny Heroines in Adventuress Tales.

Currently reading

The Bombshell Manual of Style
Laren Stover, Ruben Toledo
The Gift of Fear: Survival Signals That Protect Us from Violence
Gavin de Becker
Xenolinguistics: Psychedelics, Language, and the Evolution of Consciousness
Allyson Grey, Diana Reed Slattery
In The Eye of The Beholder: A Novel of The Phantom of the Opera
Sharon E. Cathcart

Top Five Books' digital edition of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Illustrated) (Top Five Classics) - Robert Louis Stevenson

The publisher (Top Five Books), of this particular e-book edition of a public domain classic, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), by Robert Louise Stevenson, has formatted the story well and included an introduction, biography, and the original illustrations (1904) by Charles Raymond Macauley. Top Five is also the publisher for other classics which include illustrations (their digital version of 'Dracula' has maps, and their Sherlock Holmes contains all the original illustrations from The Strand magazine--that is a win/win for me). It's hard to find their book list at Amazon as Top Five Books has not tagged themselves very well, but I'm pleased with their digital editions and just want to give them a nod to distinguish their e-books from the huge sea of questionable public domain e-books.

 

As to the story? Always a psychological classic; it's the foundation to build even deeper (and lurid) visual tales upon, which was what happened on the stage (to great effect), and in film. The 1931 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (American Pre-Code horror film directed by Rouben Mamoulian and starring Fredric March), is one in particular that focused on the sexual angle that's only hinted at (with the usual Victorian reserve), in the original story. It is a study on the possible purity of evil and of our selfishness, and fits neatly into themes I'm pondering as I move into writing my next Dark Victorian book, Everlife.